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Monthly Archives

May 2017

MASTER CLASS: How to Change Bad Behaviors at Work

By | Workplace bullying | No Comments

Here’s the deal.

I’m going to spill the beans. I plan to teach you everything I know about solving the problem of bad behaviors by replacing them with positive ones. I will teach you how to create a positive workplace culture.

The cool thing is that the course will occur over several months – so you can implement what you learn along the way.

We will hold our first interactive webinar on June 29, and we will talk every other Thursday after that until October 5. (Don’t worry, every session will be recorded so you can listen to them if you need to miss a class.)

You’ll also get four, 30-minute one-on-one calls with me along the way, and a private Facebook group so you can stay in touch with me and your classmates to discuss challenges and wins.

You will literally be implementing what you learn along the way. This is so much better than a two-day intensive course – where you go back to your office and have no idea where to start.

By the end of the course, you will have:

  • Developed the ability to speak confidently about culture and the impact it has on an organization
  • Created and distributed a climate survey to your organization
  • Started the process of a strategic plan to address the results of your survey and tie in your core values
  • Created an engagement committee from your own workforce
  • Implemented a monthly pulse survey to gauge your organization’s culture moving forward
  • Obtained insight for training your workforce in skills related to your core values
  • Updated your performance evaluation system to include your core values and other important pieces
  • Updated your recruiting, interviewing and onboarding processes to include culture and core values
  • Developed strong relationships with other course takers

If you hired me as a consultant, this project would cost you about $17,000. I’m going to guide you through the process of culture change for only $1,997. Bring a buddy and it’s only $1,697.

Fill out an applicationsend me an email, or give me a call at 619-454-4489 if you’re interested in registering.

There’s only room for a few more people, so act fast!

Catherine

CivilityPartners.com
619-454-4489

Three podcasts and a WSJ

By | Workplace bullying | No Comments

In the spirit of keeping the information coming at you in a lot of different ways, I’ve got a few things lined up for you:

First, I was recently a guest on Andrew Barrett’s podcast, Safety on Tap. We talked about what you can do to make something abstract, like employee engagement, more tangible for leaders and employees. Check it out here.

Second, I also appeared as a guest on Joanie Connell’s podcast, REAL Life Lessons. Joanie focused her questions mostly on targets of workplace bullying and how to overcome bullying from that standpoint. Check it out here.

Third, tomorrow (Wednesday) I’ll be delivering a webinar (okay, not a podcast as my subject line suggested) with Dr. Jerry Carbo, a professor at Shippensburg University and lawyer, on the topic of building a legally enforceable civil work environment.

With all the tweets being sent out by our President, BLR was interested in understanding how employers can mitigate that behavior without crossing into freedom of speech issues. There’s a fee to attend, but if you’re worried about how civility steps on civil rights, I recommend registering.

Fourth, I’ve already had several people show interest in my online master class.

I’m going to teach you everything I know about solving bad behaviors at work. Then you can repeat the process in your own organization.

The course is online and begins June 29 (in my last email it said July 29… that was a mistake).

We will hold one interactive webinar every other week, and you will have the chance to implement what you learned between webinars. So much better than a two-day course crammed full of information.

Fill out an application if you’re interested, and I will follow up with a phone call to share more details.

No travel. And if you miss a class you can listen to the recording.

Claim your spot ASAP – I’m only taking 7 people.

Sincerely,
Catherine

The Ultimate Cost of Workplace Bullying: Police Brutality

By | Workplace bullying | No Comments

I’ve recently come across several articles regarding workplace bullying in law enforcement. Articles from media channels such as Courier Mail, the New York Times, and the Guardian have flooded my inbox with sad stories and alarming stats.

Australia’s Union secretary Mick Barnes even called the Gold Coast police headquarters “bully central.”

How sad… and how confusing. How is it that people focused on stopping bad behaviors are actively behaving badly? They’re supposed to protect civil rights, not invite them… Aren’t they?

I don’t get it.

How are organizations supposed to implement a positive workplace when the government, our guidepost and ringleader, can’t even set the example?

Yes – I’m aware of the lingering presence of police brutality and the work that is going into stopping it. I know that activists, along with the government, are doing the best of their ability to end police brutality. Although I don’t discredit this attempt, I don’t think they should view bullying as a tiny slice of the pie. It’s actually a pretty fat slice.

Bullying is the catalyst of police brutality. It invites rage, harassment, and other bad behaviors that trigger police brutality. Unless we put a stop to it, law enforcers will continue to allow the misconduct to thrive.

Bad behaviors are systemic, and are a social phenomenon. They don’t happen in a vacuum. The organization and its culture is what allows these behaviors to thrive.

So… Here’s looking at you, Government. What’s up with your culture?

Something is off, so I decided to do some digging.

What I found

A highly critical report by the College of Policing reported a “macho, arrogant, bullying culture” in the industry. The study, which examined cases of alleged misconduct involving chief police officers and staff, described bullying as a feature of a “’command-and-control” management style.

I found the study informative and enlightening. I’ll leave the facts to the reporters, so I’ll just leave with you with a few of my key takeaways:

According to a police insider:

“[The force] is defined by a macho, arrogant, bullying culture and it tends to recruit a particular kind of candidate in that mould.”

“Being a large force it is possible to shove people around, move them into other roles, and this is used as a threat to force a particular approach, particularly around performance management.”

And… my favorite:

“You get your first chief officer appointment and you suddenly wake up and think, ‘I can be the bully.’”

What I gathered

It is clear as day. Bright workers are promoted, and with their promotion comes a badge of honor in the form of the right to bully. Bullying is being passed on from chief officer to chief officer as if it were a righteous skillset.

Because this behavior has become so engraved in police officers’ brains, it’s going to take a lot for the police department to change its culture – and it’s not in the form of additional laws, regulations and anti-bullying policies. It’s in the form of replacement.

The next step

Negative and aggressive workplace behaviors are systemic. In order to effectively remove them, holistic and system-wide solutions should focus on prevention, not correction.

Police department officers shouldn’t focus on the corrective actions involving eradication of problems and negativity. Instead, they should find solutions that create a safe and civil workplace.

That’s the secret: replacing bad behaviors with positive ones.

Rather than saying no to bullying, police department leaders should be saying yes to a civil workplace. This can be done by facilitating employees’ ability to work together in creating a workplace where positive, professional relationships will thrive.

They can do this by focusing their efforts three areas: policy, culture, and leadership.

Policy: Implementing a healthy workplace corporate policy provides information about what respectful and civil behavior looks like in your organization. This policy also addresses behavior that may not be as egregious as sexual harassment, for example, but is uncivil enough to cause a breakdown in communication and damage work product and customer service.

Culture: Address what behaviors should be seen from the police force, then include these behaviors in the healthy workplace policy. You can use them to create values statements and action items, and intertwine the list with performance management programs. Following the policy, training can be provided on those behaviors, as well as in areas that highlight positive behavior, including conflict resolution, negotiation, interpersonal communication, assertiveness, forgiveness, gratitude, empathy, stress management, leadership, and optimism.

Leadership: Leadership must be transparent about their support for a civil work environment for it to come to fruition. In addition, leaders should be trained on positive leadership skills, coaching uncivil employees, and publicly rewarding those who engage in positive workplace behaviors. They should be trained in building upon employee strengths, rather than finding and correcting their weaknesses.

Conclusion

As long as policies focus on quotas for speeding tickets, NOT engaging in police brutality, and policies that cover discrimination, for example, the bigger picture is being ignored.

And at this point, with bullying spreading around like an infectious disease, it seems culture change is nearly unattainable for police departments. Nearly… but not completely.
Serious changes in policy, culture and leadership must be made, starting with chief officers. It will be quite the challenge, however – if done effectively – it can save the police force’s brutal environment. Better yet, it can save lives.

I got to appear in an ad in the WSJ

By | Workplace bullying | No Comments

Something kind of cool happened – I was in the Wall Street Journal.

Hiscox, the company I get my business insurance through, invited me to appear in their full-page WSJ ad. They are focused on courageous entrepreneurs, and after interviewing me they said I fit the bill.

(Hiscox, by the way, has supurb customer service and they are relatively cheap. I’ve referred several friends to them and all have come back and said they saved about $600/year. If you’re a small business owner, check them out.)

Here’s the ad:

One Word = A World of Possibilities

By | Workplace bullying | One Comment

A few weeks ago I partnered up with my friend, Skip Weisman, to bring you the seven deadly sins of communication and how to overcome them.

My favorite tip offered was to stop saying, “but” and instead say, “and.”

For example, instead of, “That’s a good idea, BUT we tried it before and it didn’t work,” try, “That’s a good idea, AND we should look at why it didn’t work last time to make it work this time.” Instead of, “That’s a good idea, BUT we don’t have the money,” try, “That’s a good idea, AND we will need to figure out the ROI if we’re going to get approval.”

Look how the world of possibilities opens up!

On a totally different note, I’ve gotten several emails from people wondering when I’m going to offer my train-the-trainer course again, so I’m going to offer it again.

This time the course will be online, and spread over four months. We will hold one interactive webinar every other week, and you will have the chance to go and implement what you learned between webinars. Then we can debrief and discuss our wins and challenges on the next call.

I’m going to teach you everything I know about how to create and sustain a positive workplace culture, so that you can repeat the process in your own organization.

If you’re interested, click here to fill out an application. I will follow up with a phone call.

Our first group meeting will be on July 29… our last will be on October 26. No travel, no scheduling issues. If you miss a call you’ll be able to listen to the recording of it. And in addition to the group calls, you’ll get a bank of four hours to use with me privately as you go.

This is the first time I am doing this, so I am only accepting 7 attendees. Claim your spot ASAP by filling out the application.

Catherine

P.S. If you’re thinking, “I’d love to do this BUT…,” try, “I’d love to do this AND I’m going to submit the form to get more information.”

[RADIO SHOW] How to “Fight Back” Against Bullies at Work!

By | Workplace bullying | No Comments

I had so much fun joining Women Lead Radio for an interview with Dr. Joanie Connell, the host of REAL Life Lessons. The show invites REAL (resilient, empowered, authentic, limber) women to speak about what it takes to be successful in the real world.

Bullying is very much alive, and us women must stand tall and strong when facing – or witnessing – such behaviors. Throughout our conversation, Joanie and I talk about finding the strength, courage, and resilience one needs to fight back against bullies at work.

Check it out for yourself:

 

Sincerely,

Catherine